Vromans’ Blog Interview with Victoria Patterson

A Pasadena local, Victoria Patterson has spent a lot of time at Vromans Bookstore. In an interview with Vromans Blog she talks about her new critically acclaimed novel THIS VACANT PARADISE and the many hours she spent at Vromans to finish it.  Here’s an excerpt: “Tell me about your history with Vroman’s? I have quite a history with Vroman’s.  It’s still where I get my books, and I’ve taken my boys to Vroman’s since they were born. In fact, I used to come to Vroman’s coffee shop and write while my kids were at church daycare.  And I wrote there often.  This is when my kids were very young, and I was desperate for time to write.  I wrote an essay about it: you can read it here. When Drift’s publication date arrived, I went to Vroman’s to buy my book.  I went alone.  I can’t tell you the feeling: walking into Vroman’s and seeing my book.  I will never forget it.  After I bought Drift, I went to the coffee shop where I used to write to show the workers, and they were all happy for me because they knew me.  One of the customers overheard us and asked me, “Did it take you a long time to write it?”  Before I answered, one of the employees said, “Oh yes!  It took her forever.  She was always in here–writing, writing.  It took her a very, very long time.” Don’t miss Victoria Patterson’s joint reading with James Brown at Vromans Bookstore in Pasadena tomorrow, Thursday, March 24, 7 pm. Food and drink will be...

Interview With James Brown on Addiction Inbox

Here’s an excerpt from this intriguing and insightful Q&A on Addiction Inbox with author James Brown: “Q. Tom McGuane once referred to alcoholism as “the writer’s black lung disease.” Why do you think so many prominent writers have been addicted to alcohol or other drugs? James Brown: The list of alcoholic writers is long: Hemingway, Kerouac, Eugene O’Neil, Dorothy Parker, Fitzgerald, Jean Rhys, Poe, Faulkner, and on and on. The only rationalization I can come up with, at least in regard to my own addiction, is spending long, long hours alone in a room, trapped in my own head, imagination, feelings, memories and thoughts, and when it’s time to resurface, to leave that room and return to the world that exists outside the sheltered perimeters of my mind, I’d want a drink to ease myself back into it. Without that drink, and the many that followed it, because not even from the beginning could I or did I want to stop after just one or two, it was stimuli overload.  Lights seemed brighter.  Noises louder. I was expected by my wife and children to just return to earth and join their lives when a big part of me was still locked up in that room. But these are rationalizations. As the years passed, and the alcohol and drugs took greater hold of me, using and drinking was no longer about easing back into the world but eluding it altogether, where I didn’t have to feel or think.   Did booze or drugs help me creatively? No. That’s myth, a lie, this notion of the tragic artist. Outside of Kerouac’s On...

JDPR NEWS

Victoria Patterson speaks with Tia Nevitt about This Vacant Paradise: “Was it difficult to sell a novel that took place in the recent past? It’s always difficult to sell a novel!  But the time period didn’t seem to be an obstacle.  I tried not to think about the commercial prospects of the book while writing it.  Nothing will sink my work quicker than if it’s got the whiff of desperation or money on it.  I’m at my best when I write like I don’t...

JDPR NEWS

Escapism Through Books Interview with Victoria Patterson: “I lived in Newport Beach during junior high and high school, and it was then that I decided that I would write about it. Through the years, I saw the way that Orange County was depicted in the media, giving it this cultural mystique, and it wasn’t how I experienced it. So that fueled me even more. And I was always more interested in those that lived on the fringes of wealth.”  ...