The Adjustment by Scott Philips – a must-read for hard-boiled crime fiction fans

After his impressive first debut novel THE ICE HARVEST (which was adapted into the 2005 feature film directed by Harold Ramis, starring John Cusack and Billy Bob Thornton), author Scott Philips is returning to true noir form with THE ADJUSTMENT. Taking place post World War II, the novel tells a short, dark, and completely unredemptive story set once again in Wichita and featuring Scott’s rogues’ gallery of crooks, hookers, and generally unpleasant folk. “Phillips’s gritty noir manages to hook the reader with one of the more repellant leads in recent memory, Wayne Ogden…a thoroughly bad egg [who] will appeal to hard-boiled fans who don’t need redeeming features to become engaged with a character.” — Publishers Weekly http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-58243-730-9 “Phillips’ hometown, again becomes a prime location for seedy noir. Crime fans, especially those who favor a vivid sense of place and time, will love it.” — Booklist To be published in Booklist’s July 2011 issue....

Victoria Patterson on Radiance by Louis B. Jones

Author Victoria Patterson (This Vacant Paradise) reviewed Radiance by Louis B. Jones for Three Guys One Book. Excerpt: “Mark Perdue is the kind of perfectly flawed and contemplative character that I love, quietly tortured over everyday events—like being put on hold on the phone: “And with a clotting sound in the earpiece, the intelligible universe everywhere was smothered and he was plunged into an insulted solitude. Worse than solitude, he was plunged, all unprepared, into the paucity of his life.” For the full review, visit: http://threeguysonebook.com/radiance-by-louis-b-jones  ...

Valerie Trueblood on Weddings, Writings and More

Valerie Trueblood shares her insights on marriage on author Caroline Leavitt’s blog: “A wedding is a good place to think.  We cry at the start as the bride comes forward, smile at the end as the couple sweeps past, but in between, while people get up and down, hand each other things, read from shaking pieces of paper, there’s a lull.  Despite the voices, it seems as if a mute has been put on the scene.  That’s when I try, in the pew or the little plastic chair sinking into the grass, to formulate a position. Is marriage a good thing? Is it a good thing with a lot of bad things happening in it?  Is it a bad thing with a lot of good people in it trying to make improvements?  Is it a natural state?  Do we have to live in pairs?  Is that even the pattern any more, or are we replacing it with something else, and if so, what?” To read the full article:...

Vromans’ Blog Interview with Victoria Patterson

A Pasadena local, Victoria Patterson has spent a lot of time at Vromans Bookstore. In an interview with Vromans Blog she talks about her new critically acclaimed novel THIS VACANT PARADISE and the many hours she spent at Vromans to finish it.  Here’s an excerpt: “Tell me about your history with Vroman’s? I have quite a history with Vroman’s.  It’s still where I get my books, and I’ve taken my boys to Vroman’s since they were born. In fact, I used to come to Vroman’s coffee shop and write while my kids were at church daycare.  And I wrote there often.  This is when my kids were very young, and I was desperate for time to write.  I wrote an essay about it: you can read it here. When Drift’s publication date arrived, I went to Vroman’s to buy my book.  I went alone.  I can’t tell you the feeling: walking into Vroman’s and seeing my book.  I will never forget it.  After I bought Drift, I went to the coffee shop where I used to write to show the workers, and they were all happy for me because they knew me.  One of the customers overheard us and asked me, “Did it take you a long time to write it?”  Before I answered, one of the employees said, “Oh yes!  It took her forever.  She was always in here–writing, writing.  It took her a very, very long time.” Don’t miss Victoria Patterson’s joint reading with James Brown at Vromans Bookstore in Pasadena tomorrow, Thursday, March 24, 7 pm. Food and drink will be...

JDPR NEWS

Victoria Patterson & the Continuous Dialogue Between Writers: “As writers, we do tend to talk to each other through our work. John Updike said, “I have almost always begun a book with another book in mind…” Through what he called such “intertextuality,” Updike felt, “writers give each other the courage to carry...