How to Start a Travel Blog

Want to become an awesome travel blogger, but don’t know where to start? Here are some words of advice, to help start a fabulous, catchy and interesting travel blog. 1 // Determine your specialty Travel is the most crowded niche there is, so you would want to make sure that your site stands out. What can you offer that other travel blogs don’t? Narrowing your topic so you cover only a city, town, country or continent is great but you might have some difficulty in expanding later on, especially if your domain name is dependent on it. Want inspiration? A few travel bloggers share combine their expertise with travel. For example, you might want to focus on family travel, budget travel, traveling as a vegetarian and so on. Basically, what you need to do is offer a twist in your blog that people do not get from other sites. 2 // Come up with a memorable domain name A domain name, or the address or URL of your site, is among the biggest steps you need to make in starting a travel blog. For one, you do not want it to be made up of more than five words otherwise, remembering it will be a pain. One-word names are great but you can go up to three. Choose a name that best describes what you blog about and make sure that it has not been taken yet or registered as a business name. If your preferred name is not available, you can try to add an article like ‘the’ but you must remember that there is a huge likelihood...

7 Tips On How To Manage The Fear Of Going On National TV by Stan Popovich

You’re an expert in your field and you have limited resources and a limited budget. One day, you get a phone call or email from a National TV show asking if you want to do a live appearance on their show. Although your excited, you wonder if you have what it takes to be on a show that will be seen by millions around the country. You start to doubt yourself and fear takes over. What do you do? Here are 7 tips on how to manage your fear and anxiety of going on National TV. 1. Establish Some Goals. Many people who have a chance to go on National TV deal with the fear of what might happen. Sometimes their stress and anxiety becomes so great, that some people decide at the last minute not to go on the show. To prevent your fears from taking over, you should write down a list of reasons of why you want to be on TV. Having a sense of purpose of going on TV can be used as motivation in overcoming your fears and anxieties. 2.Use Self-Visualization. Many experts who go on TV get anxious before going on the air. When this happens, visualize yourself doing the event in your mind. For instance, you have to do a live show in front of a large group of people in the next few days. Before the big day comes, imagine yourself doing the event in your mind. By doing this, you will be better prepared when the time comes. Self-Visualization is a great way to reduce the fear and stress of...

Victoria Patterson recommends…

From P&W: Writers recommend “Always tucked in a pocket of my purse is a Moleskine journal. I try to write every day, no matter what, and I’ve pulled that Moleskine out while waiting for my kids—doctor’s appointments, soccer practices, piano lessons. In my Moleskine, I allow myself the freedom to write anything. No matter the inanity—it has my full permission to go down uncensored. I doodle. I make lists. I describe the waiting rooms, piano lessons, parents in the stands. And if I lose my Moleskine, my name and phone number are displayed, with a reward offered of one billion dollars.” —Victoria Patterson, author of This Vacant Paradise (Counterpoint, 2011)  ...

Valerie Trueblood on Weddings, Writings and More

Valerie Trueblood shares her insights on marriage on author Caroline Leavitt’s blog: “A wedding is a good place to think.  We cry at the start as the bride comes forward, smile at the end as the couple sweeps past, but in between, while people get up and down, hand each other things, read from shaking pieces of paper, there’s a lull.  Despite the voices, it seems as if a mute has been put on the scene.  That’s when I try, in the pew or the little plastic chair sinking into the grass, to formulate a position. Is marriage a good thing? Is it a good thing with a lot of bad things happening in it?  Is it a bad thing with a lot of good people in it trying to make improvements?  Is it a natural state?  Do we have to live in pairs?  Is that even the pattern any more, or are we replacing it with something else, and if so, what?” To read the full article:...